The 13th People’s National Congress (“NPC”) recently approved the State Council’s proposal to restructure China’s State Intellectual Property Office (“SIPO”). The proposal intends to consolidate the administration of trademarks and patents and to streamline the enforcement of IPR in China. Continue Reading China Unveils Plan to Restructure State Intellectual Property Office

In April 2018, Amazon Technologies, Inc., a subsidiary of e-commerce giant Amazon, was granted a patent relating to a “technology for a streaming data marketplace” by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). The technology underlying the patent is described as gathering (online) data streams from various sources and enhancing those streams “by correlating the raw data with additional data.” The patent description lists a number of potential use cases for the streaming data feeds that participants in the market place are offering subscriptions to. One notable use case relates to “bitcoin transactions,” with the ultimate goal of identifying users of the virtual currency by their Bitcoin addresses. Continue Reading The Bitcoin Implications of Amazon’s New Streaming Data Patent

According to reports published on 11 June 2017, the German Federal Constitutional Court has requested the Federal President of Germany to refrain from signing the law that is necessary to ratify the Agreement on a Unified Patent Court (UPC). The president has agreed to comply with this request. The president’s signing is the last step required for a law to come into force after it has already passed both legislative chambers in Germany. Continue Reading UPC: German Ratification Postponed Due to a Request by the German Federal Constitutional Court

The future of the European Unified Patent Court (UPC) appears to look a bit clearer following recent ratification activities. On 16 January 2017, the Preparatory Committee for the UPC announced on its website that it is working under the assumption that the UPC can become operational in December 2017. However, the Committee stated that this timeline is conditional on a number of factors, with the most important being “the necessary ratifications of the [UPC Agreement] and accession to the Protocol on Provisional Application”. So far, twelve EU Member States have ratified the UPC Agreement, including France (14 March 2014) and Italy (10 February 2017). Continue Reading German Parliament Approves Ratification of the UPC Agreement

On 18 November 2016, the European Commission published a notice on the application of certain key provisions within Regulation (EC) No. 141/2000 on orphan medicinal products (the “Orphan Regulation”). Orphan medicinal products are medicinal products that are used for the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of rare diseases. An orphan designation allows a pharmaceutical company to benefit from EU incentives to develop a medicinal product, such as fee waivers for the regulatory procedures or a ten year market exclusivity. Continue Reading European Commission Publishes Revised Guidelines on Criteria for Orphan Designations of Medicinal Products

busy Street scene with neon signs in Hong KongIntellectual Property (“IP”) rights are only as strong as the means to enforce them. Arbitration, as a private and confidential procedure, is increasingly being used to resolve disputes involving IP rights, especially when the dispute is between parties located in different jurisdictions. With the introduction of the Arbitration (Amendment) Bill 2016 (“Bill”), the Hong Kong government hopes this will give it an edge over competing arbitral seats in the region. The main effect of the Bill would be that enforcement of an award under Part 10 of the Ordinance would not be refused in Hong Kong under either the arbitrability ground or the public policy ground merely because the award involved IP rights.

The Scope of the Bill

The Bill has been in the pipeline for almost two years. It sets out a broad definition of IP rights to include, inter alia, rights to confidential information, trade secrets or know-how, rights to protect goodwill by way of passing off or similar actions against unfair competition. The bill clarifies that all disputes relating to the subsistence, scope, validity, ownership as well as infringement of IP rights are arbitrable. This includes the right to put the validity of a patent in issue in arbitral proceedings. The Bill includes a provision clarifying that an award relating to IP rights does not cover a licensee (whether or not an exclusive licensee) who is not a party to the arbitral proceedings. A licensee is, however, not prohibited from commencing arbitration proceedings without the owner of the IP being a party to the proceedings

All of the major arbitration centers, such as the International Court of Arbitration, the London Court of International Arbitration and World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) Arbitration and Mediation Center have adapted their arbitration rules to better suit IP disputes. As a result, the number of IP cases being heard by these centres continues to rise.

Conclusion

The international arbitration of IP disputes is on the rise, although it is still not as widely used to resolve disputes compared to other sectors (e.g., construction, energy and oil and gas). Hopefully the introduction of the Bill will reinforce the use of arbitration as a means to resolve IP disputes, as well as help consolidate Hong Kong’s position as an IP international dispute resolution centre.

Click here to read the full Mayer Brown JSM Asia IP & TMT: Quarterly Review (2016 Q4).

 

This article was originally published on AllAboutIP – Mayer Brown’s  blog on relevant developments in the fields of intellectual property and unfair competition law. For intellectual property-themed videos, Mayer Brown has launched a dedicated channel available here.

On 2 December 2016, President Obama issued an administrative order to prohibit the proposed acquisition of a controlling interest in Aixtron SE (Aixtron) by Grand Chip Investment GmbH (GCI), a German company partially owned by Fuijan Grand Chip Investment Fund LP, a Chinese partnership with some Chinese government ownership. It was only the third time in history that a US president has formally blocked a proposed foreign acquisition of a US business due to national security concerns identified during the review process by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS). Continue Reading US President Blocks Proposed Chinese Acquisition of German Semiconductor Company on National Security Grounds

On 28 November 2016, the UK government issued a press release that, despite the UK’s leave from the EU, commonly known as “Brexit,” it still plans to ratify the Agreement on a Unified Patent Court (“UPC Agreement”) over the coming months. The UPC Agreement was signed by 24 out of 25 EU Member States that participate in the enhanced cooperation procedure to create a unitary patent system in the EU, including the UK. Continue Reading UK Government Signals Preparations to Ratify the UPC Agreement Despite Brexit