In its second statement of intent of the week, on 9 July 2019, the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”) announced its intention to fine Marriott International, Inc (“Marriott”) £99.2m under the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) for a personal data breach that occurred in relation to the Starwood guest reservation database system.
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The UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”) today (8 July 2019) announced its intention to fine British Airways (“BA”) £183.39m under the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) for a personal data breach. This is the highest fine issued so far by a European Union data protection supervisory authority for a personal data breach under the GDPR.
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On 12 February 2019, the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) adopted an information note “on data transfers under the GDPR in the event of a no-deal Brexit.” According to the note, as of 30 March 2019, transfers of personal data from the European Economic Area (EEA) to the UK must be based either on Standard or ad hoc Data Protection Clauses, Binding Corporate Rules, Codes of Conduct, Certification Mechanisms or Derogations.
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The UK government has published a series of four technical notices on intellectual property in the event of the UK leaving the EU on 29 March 2019 without an agreement (a ‘no deal Brexit’).  The technical notices were published on 24 September 2018 and cover: Trade marks and designs; Patents; Copyright; and Exhaustion of intellectual property rights. The notices set out the UK government’s
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On 28 November 2016, the UK government issued a press release that, despite the UK’s leave from the EU, commonly known as “Brexit,” it still plans to ratify the Agreement on a Unified Patent Court (“UPC Agreement”) over the coming months. The UPC Agreement was signed by 24 out of 25 EU Member States that participate in the enhanced cooperation procedure to create a unitary patent system in the EU, including the UK.
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Snapchat, the fast-growing social media network/messaging app, has spawned some controversy over how copyright law is interpreted in the United Kingdom. In a recent Q&A session with members of Parliament, the British government was asked whether it will take steps to prevent Snapchat images from being made public without the image owner’s consent. In his written response dated 24 March 2016, the Minister for Culture and the Digital Economy, Ed Vaizey, answered that “[u]nder UK copyright law, it would be unlawful for a Snapchat user to copy an image and make it available to the public without the consent of the image owner. The image owner would be able to sue anyone who does this for copyright infringement.”
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