In Germany, companies offering security-related services have to provide to the Federal Financial Supervisory Authority (Bundesanstalt für Finanzaufsicht, “BaFin”) information regarding the identity of staff responsible for, inter alia, providing investment advice (Section 87 of the German Securities Trading Act, “WpHG”). That personal data is kept in an internal BaFin database .
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On 5 September 2018, the German Data Protection Conference (Datenschutzkonferenz – “DSK) provided new guidance on the interpretation of Art. 13 of the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) in the context of medical treatment. The Data Protection Conference consists of all German data protection authorities meeting twice a year with the purpose of safeguarding data protection rights, providing guidance on
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On 6 September 2018, the German Federal Patent Court denied an application for a (preliminary) compulsory license under a patent related to the treatment of cholesterol-related disorders to the Applicant, group companies of a French pharmaceutical company (Case 3 LiQ 1/18). This decision is in line with previous jurisprudence of the court that has, with very few exceptions, been
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On 16 July 2018, the District Court of Gießen, Germany, ruled that a custodian’s representation rights also cover consent to data processing activities related to the person under custodianship. Under the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the processing of personal data is, in principle, prohibited unless there is a legal basis for such processing. Pursuant to Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a) GDPR, one possible legal basis is the data subject’s consent. However, the legitimacy of a declaration of consent may be in doubt if
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Pursuant to the “license barrier” rule in Sec. 4j German Income Tax Act, newly introduced as of 1 January 2018, arm’s length business expenses of a company incurred for the right to use intellectual property (“IP”) and certain other rights are not fully deductible from the income tax base, if (i) the corresponding licensing income of the licensor is taxed at a rate lower than 25% (“Preferential Taxation”), (ii) this low tax rate is not the standard tax rate applicable in the respective jurisdiction
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According to media reports, the first cease-and-desist letters have been issued in relation to alleged violations of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The cease-and-desist letters seem to concern, inter alia, data protection declarations on websites. In particular, the letters seem to address specific website tools (e.g., Google Fonts, Like buttons) and whether their use and description in the data protection declaration is compliant with the GDPR.
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Aktuellen Presseberichten zufolge sind erste Abmahnungen aufgrund von behaupteten Verstößen gegen die EU Datenschutzgrundverordnung (DSGVO) ergangen. Die ergangenen Abmahnungen betrafen etwa Datenschutzerklärungen auf Web-Seiten; im Konkreten die datenschutzkonforme Einbindung und Beschreibung von bestimmten Tools (bspw. Google-Fonts, Like Buttons).
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On 29 May 2018, only five days after the GDPR became applicable, the Regional Court of Bonn issued the first ruling applying the GDPR in Europe (file no. 10 O 171/18). The dispute involved the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) and the ICANN-accredited registrar EPAG Domainservices GmbH (EPAG).

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Christian Wulff, a former German Federal President who resigned in February 2012, caught the attention of the public in May 2015 with his announcement that he was back together with his ex-wife Bettina Wulff. Following this, the press published a photograph of him pushing a cart at the parking lot of a supermarket next to his wife, Bettina Wulff. Mr. Wulff felt hurt in his right to privacy. He filed a lawsuit aiming to prohibit the publication of this private photo. In first and second instance Mr. Wulff was successful; the German Federal Court now overruled the previous decisions and decided that Mr. Wulff’s right to privacy were not infringed by the publication of the photo.
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Back in 2015 Constantin Film AG, the production company of the German movie „Fack ju Göhte“, filed an European Union trademark application (“EUTM”) for its movie title „Fack ju Göhte“ with the European Union Intellectual Property Office (“EUIPO”). The EUTM application was refused by the EUIPO based on an alleged infringement of public policy and common decency. On top of that, EUIPO was of the opinion that the title of the movie is an offensive insult that would damage the German highly respected writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe posthumously. Constantin Film’s appeal against this decision was also not successful, so that they now brought that case before the General Court of the European Union.
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