Christian Wulff, a former German Federal President who resigned in February 2012, caught the attention of the public in May 2015 with his announcement that he was back together with his ex-wife Bettina Wulff. Following this, the press published a photograph of him pushing a cart at the parking lot of a supermarket next to his wife, Bettina Wulff. Mr. Wulff felt hurt in his right to privacy. He filed a lawsuit aiming to prohibit the publication of this private photo. In first and second instance Mr. Wulff was successful; the German Federal Court now overruled the previous decisions and decided that Mr. Wulff’s right to privacy were not infringed by the publication of the photo. Continue Reading The Right to Privacy of a Former Federal President

Back in 2015 Constantin Film AG, the production company of the German movie „Fack ju Göhte“, filed an European Union trademark application (“EUTM”) for its movie title „Fack ju Göhte“ with the European Union Intellectual Property Office (“EUIPO”). The EUTM application was refused by the EUIPO based on an alleged infringement of public policy and common decency. On top of that, EUIPO was of the opinion that the title of the movie is an offensive insult that would damage the German highly respected writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe posthumously. Constantin Film’s appeal against this decision was also not successful, so that they now brought that case before the General Court of the European Union. Continue Reading The General Court of the European Union Rules on the Immorality of the Movie Title „Fack ju Göhte“

On 1 March 2018, new arbitration rules of the German Institution of Arbitration (“Deutsche Institution für Schiedsgerichtsbarkeit“, “DIS”) will come into force. The revised DIS Rules are designed to suit the needs of both domestic and international parties. They also aim to enhance the efficiency of arbitration, providing proceedings that are non-bureaucratic, flexible and open to party autonomy.

IP arbitration is a growing trend. Parties to a licensing agreement, to a technology transfer agreement or even competitors fighting over the amount of FRAND royalties for a Standard Essential Patent may wish to refer their dispute to arbitration to keep the dispute confidential and to have IP experts solve the matter as arbitrators. The DIS arbitration rules are not specific to any sector or type of dispute and are also suitable for IP disputes.

View the key amendments to the DIS arbitration rules in the following article by our Arbitration experts Dr. Mark C. Hilgard, Dr. Jan Kraayvanger, Armineh Gharibian, Dr. Nadine Pieper und Ana Bruder:

 

Now that the time of the year has come, it seems like everything is all about finding the perfect gift, decorating your house in the most beautiful Christmas colors, baking Christmas cookies and of course, going to Christmas markets. But even while we are enjoying the peaceful and contemplative atmosphere – and obviously to drink one or the other mulled wines we are not spared from being confronted with the German trademark law. Insofar we would like to conclude this year with  a decision of the German Patent Court which dates back to 2006, but which perfectly fits into the advent and Christmas season. Continue Reading We Wish You a Happy Christmas! Enjoy your time at the Christkindlesmarkt!

According to reports published on 11 June 2017, the German Federal Constitutional Court has requested the Federal President of Germany to refrain from signing the law that is necessary to ratify the Agreement on a Unified Patent Court (UPC). The president has agreed to comply with this request. The president’s signing is the last step required for a law to come into force after it has already passed both legislative chambers in Germany. Continue Reading UPC: German Ratification Postponed Due to a Request by the German Federal Constitutional Court

On 12 January 2017, the German Federal Court of Justice has handed down its second landmark decision on cheat software within three months. After clarifying the question under which conditions cheat software may constitute copyright infringement in October last year, the Federal Court of Justice has now decided that cheat software can constitute an act of unfair competition, too.

To be able to play online games, e.g. World of Warcraft (WoW) or Diablo III , it is necessary to download a client software and install it on the computer. Achieving progress within the game regularly takes several hours. To save time and to easily achieve the goals of the game some companies develop software, so-called cheat- or buddy-bots, allowing the player to overcome the challenges of the game automatically. Online game developers are not pleased by this fact, which is why they try to prevent the distribution of such cheat bots up front. Continue Reading German Federal Court of Justice Shows the Red Card to Cheat Software for Online Role-Playing Games

The future of the European Unified Patent Court (UPC) appears to look a bit clearer following recent ratification activities. On 16 January 2017, the Preparatory Committee for the UPC announced on its website that it is working under the assumption that the UPC can become operational in December 2017. However, the Committee stated that this timeline is conditional on a number of factors, with the most important being “the necessary ratifications of the [UPC Agreement] and accession to the Protocol on Provisional Application”. So far, twelve EU Member States have ratified the UPC Agreement, including France (14 March 2014) and Italy (10 February 2017). Continue Reading German Parliament Approves Ratification of the UPC Agreement

The question of whether a sequence of exercises, such as yoga poses or dance moves, can be copyrighted has occupied the attention of international courts, scholars and copyright offices for some time. In late 2015, the issue received some media attention when yoga guru Bikram Choudhur tried to gain a US copyright in a signature sequence of yoga poses but failed before the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Curcuit. Despite the effort of international copyright conventions, the question of copyrightability essentially remains a matter of national law. Continue Reading The Copyrightability of Yoga Poses, Dance Moves and Exercise Routines

According to the code of ethics of the International Association of Culinary Professionals, a culinary professional must not knowingly “appropriate […] any recipe or other intellectual property belonging to another without the proper recognition.” And, in addition to the ethical, there are legal issues. While copying culinary creations might not sound like a big deal to millennial food bloggers and vloggers, lawsuits—sometimes with high stakes—have been filed over (mis)appropriated recipes. But whether claims to a signature dish will hold up in court is a different question and will likely depend on the scope of protection of the applicable copyright law(s). Continue Reading Your IP Valentine: Can Recipes Be Protected by Copyright?