On 10 November 2016, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) ruled that a trademark on the shape of the Rubik’s Cube—supposedly the world’s bestselling toy of all time—is invalid (Case C‑30/15 P). With its judgment, the Court, inter alia, annulled a 2009 decision of the European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) that initially confirmed registration of the cube as an EU trademark.

The Rubik’s Cube was invented in 1974 by Hungarian architect Ernő Rubik. It was originally named “Magic Cube.” In 1980, the toy was renamed Rubik’s Cube and launched internationally.
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The Olympic Games 2016 which take place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 5 to 21 August are supported by a huge volume of marketing and advertising campaigns. As many countries have done before, Brazil enacted special legislation to protect the Olympic symbols and expressions specific to the games hosted in Rio. The protection offered in these Olympic-special legislations often can go beyond what would normally be available under trademark or copyright protection laws. For example, the London Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Act 2006 created a sui generis right of association to prevent the use of any representation that is likely to suggest an association between the London Olympics and goods or services.
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On 29 September 2007, a PRC entity, Xintong Tiandi Technology (Beijing) Company Limited (“Xintong”), filed a trademark application for the word “IPHONE” in class 18 (“Opposed Mark”) with the PRC Trade Marks Office (“TMO”). The goods covered by the application are a range of leather goods, wallets and cases under sub-classes 1801 and 1802. On 26 April 2010, Apple Inc. (“Apple”) filed an opposition against the Opposed Mark. It should be noted, however, that Apple does not have any China trademark applications or registrations for the word “IPHONE” in class 18 that pre-date the filing date of the Opposed Mark.
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On 16 June 2016, the General Court of the European Union rejected an opposition by Fútbol Club Barcelona to the wordmark “KULE” (T‑614/14). The opposition was based on an alleged infringement of the club’s Spanish wordmark “CULE,” the term culé being a Spanish variation of the Catalan word cul and used as a nickname for supporters of the club. Apparently, this is not the only negative experience Fútbol Club Barcelona has had with the General Court in recent years. In 2015, the General Court dismissed an action brought by the club seeking registration of the outline of its crest as a Community trademark (T-615/14).
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In a recent decision, the Supreme People’s Court of China ruled that the use of a trademarked sign on goods manufactured in China solely for export purposes does not constitute “use” of a trademark. Consequently, such use could not be considered an infringement of a trademark registered in China.
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The EU Trademark Regulation (2015/2424/EU) amending the Community Trademark Regulation entered into force on 23 March 2016 (the “new Regulation”). The new Regulation is part of the EU trademark reform legislative package that also includes the replacement of the existing EU Trademarks Directive (2015/2436/EU). Some of the main changes brought about by the new rules are briefly outlined below.
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In 2013, Moncler S.P.A. (“Moncler”) became aware of the manufacture and sale of down jackets by Beijing Nuoyakate Garment Co., Ltd. (“Nuoyakate”). Nuoyakate used marks and logos confusingly similar to Moncler’s marks on its products and also applied for the registration of several trademarks and domain names confusingly similar to Moncler’s marks in China and other
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On 21 October 2015, the German Federal Court of Justice ruled that a bank cannot refuse to disclose personal data of a client if that client’s bank account was used to receive payments ‎for the sale of counterfeit trademark goods. In this case, the fundamental right of the trademark holder to protect its intellectual property prevailed over the banks’s right to secrecy.
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On 30 September 2015, the General Court of the European Union (T-364/13) ruled that the caiman logo that Polish apparel company Mocek and Wenta sought to register with the Office for Harmonisation in the Internal Market (OHIM) was similar enough to Lacoste’s iconic crocodile logo to cause confusion. Thus, the Court upheld the OHIM’s refusal to register the sign
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